Thursday, May 16, 2013

Stewed Rhubarb over Ice Cream



Part of the experience of belonging to a CSA (Community Sponsored Agriculture) is getting produce whose use is not always immediately apparent. One potential example is rhubarb. Here is a surprisingly easy recipe for an even more surprisingly tasty topping used over vanilla ice cream.



For every 3 cups of cut up rhubarb, add 1/2 cup of sugar and 2 or 3 tablespoons of water. Cook in a saucepan, over a medium heat, until the rhubarb is tender, usually about half an hour (this is not unlike how one would make cranberry sauce).

Then whisk into a sauce. It can be served hot over the ice cream, but many think chilled is even better.


26 comments:

Sarah said...

I like rhubarb but I have never craved rhubarb until this morning. That looks so old fashioned in a wonderful way. I want to sit on a breezy porch and eat that. For breakfast. Right now.

Susannah said...

My grandmother swore by rhubarb as a spring tonic. Our family has a similar dish but with maple syrup instead of sugar and a dash of vanilla. A great way to use up all that rhubarb from the patch. Love the Portmerion too.

heavy tweed jacket said...

I'm a fan of warm rhubarb sauce over ice cream. Summer at it's sweetest and tartest. Great blog!

John said...

You do cover some interesting topics !!

I love rhubarb over vanilla ice cream, and I always crumble a home-made oatmeal-raisin cookie on top of mine to add one more taste and texture.

Barbara said...

I love rhubarb so much! I freeze the sauce and have it year round - stirred into yogurt, spooned over ice cream or pound cake.

Jonathan said...

Wow, that brings back memories of summers at my grandparent's home in Cape Elizabeth. I would help Nana gather the rhubarb and then cut it up for cooking. We would have it over ice cream for dinner and I would have the left over sauce for brakfast (sans ice cream)! Yum!! Thanks for triggering that early memory.

Anonymous said...

I had never had rhubarb until we bought our house. Our new next door neighbor brought over some rhubarb plants for us. Since then, all of us have become big rhubarb fans.

I made that same sauce, but with added whole cloves, and put it over coeur a la creme (made with whole ricotta, heavy cream, and egg whites).

So far this rhubarb season I've made the above, rhubarb cake, roasted rhubarb clafouti, rhubarb cobbler, and rhubarb pie.

Suburban Princess said...

I have been craving this for a few weeks and finally got some rhubarb at the farmer's market this weekend. I will be stewing it tomorrow for an after dinner treat :O)

Anonymous said...

Rhubarb crumble and custard. Yum.

Sum

Muffy Aldrich said...

@Barbara - I never thought of using in in yogurt.

@Jonathan - Such a lovely image. Cape Elizabeth is a beautiful town.

@Anonymous - This is an ambitious list! I completely forgot about rhubarb pie.

@Suburban Princess - We've been stewing it perhaps a bit too often! I have now consumed quite a bit of ice cream.

@Sum - I second your "yum".

JoJo said...

I love rhubarb with home-made ginger ice cream. Much appreciation for your wonderful blog.

Pete said...

This recipe has been in our family for generations and is one of my favorites. Other wonderful dishes include rhubarb pie and rhubarb jam.

j.mosby said...

Seems like rhubarb is a New England summer tradition...
My grandmother from Newington,NH loved her rhubarb! To me rhubarb,it's an acquired taste.
When visiting her, I preferred her scratch made blueberry muffins and molasses cookies.

HipWaldorf said...

Great looking rhubarb recipe in the NYT yesterday. We used to pick and dip it sugar as a snack, while playing outside. Enjoy!

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/05/25/dining/rhubarb-many-ways-but-always-upside-down-a-good-appetite.html?_r=1&ref=dining

Lis said...

If you like it stewed, I highly recommend roasting it! The flavor is a bit more intense, and the fruit stays intact. We cut the stalks into two-inch pieces, lay them in a glass baking pan, put in about 1/8 in. water, some vanilla seed, lemon juice, and two tablespoons or so of sugar (some people use a 1/2 cup or more)-- roast at 350 degrees for 20-30 minutes.

I enjoy reading your posts so much!

Kathy said...

I'm glad for those who haven't aquired the taste for rhubarb because I get to eat their portion!

Flo said...

Have you ever tried using rhubarb in any of your smoothies? I imagine it would work well.

NEW Communications said...

Sounds wonderful! We have two rhubarb patches and this year I am ready to experiment. Wonderful photo and the post is so timely!

Michael Rowe said...

We always had that as a dessert as kids.

diary of a tomato said...

Even yummier when roasted/baked in the oven, the dry heat caramelizes the sugar and rhubarb!

Anonymous said...

Just like my Nana would us make when we would visit her on the Cape!

Anonymous said...

I add a few whole cloves to my rhubarb.

Bebe said...

We are fortunate with the Southern California climate where rhubarb can be cultivated year-round, and we always have a bunch growing in one corner of the garden. Now is peak strawberry season (Apr-Jun) as well, so we're soon making another trip up the coast to Oxnard, known for its superior harvest. Cleaning and freezing for storage ensures several strawberry-rhubarb pies until a longer trip up to Santa Maria near the Central Coast yields more berries around mid-September. A luscious dessert.

Nick said...

When I was a schoolboy here in England I thought rhubarb crumble and custard was boring and 'blah' -- every flippin' week for school dinners. Now I'm all growed up, I can't get enough of it.

Sarah Faragher said...

We're lucky to live near a pick-your-own organic blueberry barren, and our old house came with an ancient rhubarb patch, so every year my husband cans a lot of bluebarb jam. Sweet-tart, yum...

Bitsy said...

Just looking at the picture of ice cream with rhubarb sauce makes my mouth water. The blueberry-rhubarb jam mention by Ms. Faragher also sounds delicious.