Saturday, December 7, 2013

Maine Coast (Originally posted April, 2011)

Photos from our archives
The experiences around "summering in Maine" historically have been as influential and beneficial to the classic New England aesthetic as boarding schools and top colleges. This includes the palette, natural beauty, architecture, love of the out-of-doors, respect for work, need for ruggedness, coastal activities, and eschewing of fussiness.

One would hope any vendor trying to capture this traditional style would not trawl malls and resorts.  The goal should be to move away from consumers, as described amusingly in 2008's The Anglo Files by Sarah Lyall (Amazon link), who:
Are gaudy and tacky but who revel in their gaudy tackiness.... who like flashy jewelry and expensive, over-the-top, logo-studded designer clothes,... go on outrageous spending sprees,... exhibit inappropriate public displays of affection,... and often appear [drinking].
Rather, vendors may better spend more time along traditional Maine venues.  Here are some examples from our archives.





































34 comments:

thepreppytimes.blogspot.com said...

Very well done! A delicious slice of Americana. I could almost taste the sea water.
Great post as always.

Mona said...

Fabulous photos Muffy! Thank you for sharing.

Main Line Sportsman said...

I love the Black & White Photos...

mary anne said...

Wonderful. I love these !

Town and Country Prep said...

Beautiful pics! It's the closest we have to a time machine.

Anonymous said...

Beautifu photos -- like time captured in black and white. Thank you for sharing.

3button Max said...

great pix-

Anonymous said...

The only thing I'd take issue with is "the eschewing of fussiness," at least in one sense of the word. By definition, to be fussy means to be fastidious and hard to please in one's needs and requirements. Your blog offers ample evidence that this kind of fussiness is key to the prep sensibility. I think "fussy" has taken on a distinct negative connotation in today's "whatever" world, but more than ever, we need fussy people to help us know and understand true quality. I would agree that the prep aesthetic eschews fussiness in the "full of unnecessary detail or decoration" sense of the word. On an unrelated note, may I suggest that you check out Collared Greens (www.collaredgreens.com) of Ketchum, ID. Prep is alive and well in the Intermountain West. Thanks for the blog.

Wharf Rat said...

Having absolutely nothing to do with the superb article,and photos, but since Anonyous brought up Collared greens, a trip to that site is really worth while.

Polos: no logo, collars slightly fused so they don't bunch up under a blazer,and made in a totally environmentally friendly atmosphere.

Fit is superb. the one without the pocket runs small. Randy, who is the owner, is the model in the photo on the site, and he agrees that it would have been better one size larger. I'm small, medium fits.

Now, how to tie this into Maine? To use the Jack Benny line "I'm thinking, I'm thinking".

Trish said...

Great photos! They remind me of some of the pictures of the small town in "One Morning in Maine," my all- time favorite kid's book.

InfoDiva said...

Speaking of One Morning in Maine, let's not forget Blueberries for Sal by the same author.

Could it be that one's aesthetic sensibility is determined in early childhood?

Anonymous said...

I went to college in Maine, and these photos make me think of those happy times. Thank you for sharing!

Anonymous said...

I am from the west coast, but One Morning in Maine was my favorite book when I was little!!! My Father laughs now and says he would try to hide the book because I wanted him to read it every night and it was so long but I always found it! Sadly, my children do not like the book as much as I do (and my oldest still has not read Anne of Green Gables either, sigh, children can really break your heart.... haha) but I still insist on reading it to my youngest and we always have a good laugh when we have "clam chowder for lunch!"

M said...

For reasons I can't explain, I have always been fascinated by New England since I was quite young though I have lived my entire life in the Midwest. Perhaps it was stunning photos of fall color, lush landscapes, and craggy coasts I viewed or just the rich history that presented to my young mind a thoughtful American world before the Civil War.

As evidenced by this post, your blog is rife with savory glimpses of the timelessness of the prep aesthetic. Thanks for throwing the window open and letting me peek in.

I suspect that image of your dad sprinting out of the rain captures as much about him as it does the era and the area from which he hailed.

Mary
Flat Rock Creek Notebook

Anonymous said...

Yes, my friends and I did the 2am L.L. Bean run many times! It's been a while since anyone asked, so thank you - this really brought a smile to my face today.

Scooter Shooter said...

Beautiful black and white photos!

oxford cloth button down said...

Great pictures.Thanks for sharing them.

Shawn (Virlitas) said...

The windjammer photograph is particularly nice.

JDS said...

More great pictures. Thanks.

M.D. Johns/New Communications said...

Muffy, you have no idea how these lovely photos have lifted my spirits! It is frigid outside, and I am feeling a bit frazzled by holiday preparations. But, one look at Photos 3 and 4 from the top, as well as the others, has brightened my outlook considerably.

Oh, to live in a small village with twisty streets and plain, honest houses in simpler times!

Thank you.

Brad Cole said...

Muffy, WOW!

Cheers, BC

Bob Henkel said...

Every pictures is a Maine postcard itself. Just lovely.

Bitsy said...

Dear Muffy:

I'm enjoying the re-posts. I hope you re-post your pumpkin pie recipe as I spilled coffee on my printed copy and was unable to find it again to re-print. BTW, the pumpkin muffins are fantastic! I've been making a batch each weekend, sometimes a double batch, as they freeze beautifully.

Bitsy

Anonymous said...

Very funny Anglo Files quote and true about many social media people.

Greenfield said...

When viewing these beautiful landscapes from what many of you describe as "simpler times," it is well to remember that people in those days often kept things that "simple" because disposable income was the one thing they did not have. Certainly my own ancestors enjoyed keenly small, homey things like a pumpkin pie in the oven, a sunny spot in the parlor, a crackling fire on a freezing winter night, or a walk in snowy woods with a dog. They were not concerned with having "the latest" or whatever is "trending" in order to broadcast messages of upward mobility. Honest work and steady habits equaled upright citizenship, responsibility and dignity which were considered their own reward--if not in this world, then perhaps the next!

Their simple, made-to-last, "un-fussy" and practical clothes were made to last for decades because they HAD to last or else.

It takes considerable mental exercise in our day and age, I think, to put ourselves back those 50 or 100 years and into these people's moccasins when we have literally the shopping choices of the entire world at our fingertips, and often far more liberal finances than our predecessors enjoyed.

Something to consider this holiday season. . .

Anonymous said...

Well said, Greenfield.

MGC

M.D. Johns/New Communications said...

Greenfield, the small things you describe are exactly what I mean, and we can still enjoy them, fortunately. Our high-tech, complex lives have brought so many benefits, but I think yearning for a simpler time goes hand and hand with them. And probably with growing older...

I grew up reading Gladys Tabor and Faith Baldwin's columns in my grandmother's women's magazines, and they often described the lifestyle so many of these photographs evoke, friend and neighbors sharing, chatting over the fence, walks at dusk, etc.

I guess I would be happy if we'd see less of Miley Cyrus, the Kardashians, twerking and selfies, and more of those simple, affordable pleasures our grandparents enjoyed.

BPool Native said...

Perhaps "summering in Maine" was a delight for those entitled by their parents' inheritances and professional successes. I grew up at Biddeford Pool and the arrival of the "summer people" was difficult for the natives like myself. No longer could we roam the place we called home 12 months a year as much of it ~ the private golf course, beachfront, the boat launches were closed to us. 60 years later, these memories are still painful and undoubtably have influenced my political and social action endeavors.

Kapur said...

Seeing these rare photos from Kuwait . Always a treat to read the posts. Who took the photographs ?

Bob Henkel said...

Muffy, thank you again for continuing TDP. Seeing the comment from Kuwait--a place diametrically opposite Maine--brings home for me how small the world has become. With a few clicks on a computer the intricacies of life across generations and continents are right before us all, everywhere.

Greenfield I echo your thoughts.

Hearthstone Farms said...

Thank you for sharing the beautiful pictures of Maine. Recognize Round Pond in some of them...one of my favorite places.

Jennifer said...

Love, love, love these photos!! Maine is one of my most favorite places on earth. Thanks for taking me back there for a few minutes on this rainy grey morning.

Anonymous said...

I like your color photos of the various places you visit and also like the B & W photos your dad took. They remind me of my younger years, but often, the location where they are taken is not identified and it sure would be nice to know what towns, villages or areas are captured in them.

Chimney Cupboard said...

Catching this fine re-post before it slips away, again, it is the -effort to reach- of this photographer and his camera and this shown in the –his fetching (capturing?)- of these images that suggest (flirt with) the passionate process of the -being stymied- of deeper New England photography; the ‘if I (we) could (may) get a camera in there’. Chansonetta Emmons posed and posed and posed her “Feeding the Hens” and finally got it right (Peladeau, CHANSONETTA THE LIFE AND PHOTOGRAPHS OF CHANSONETTA STANLEY EMMONS, 1858-1937, Waldoboro, Maine, 1977, pg. 43.) Technical improvement with ever finer equipment still fails to ‘get... in there’. Deep New England still flits ahead of the camera and escapes behind the dropped curtains of their old parlors. Emmons’ THE BATHERS (pg. 89), a –her prized-, is still, and was understood by her, to be –fetched-, not -captured-. This understanding she explained with, as the author notices, high price: “The difference in value tells a great deal”.