Saturday, January 21, 2012

Fresh Food on a Snowy Day




Making chicken soup, hot chocolate and tapioca pudding, or Fish Eye Pudding. 

Hot Chocolate Ingredients

Tapioca Ingredients include fresh eggs from this morning.


Many prefer to have their tapioca pudding warm.
It is the freshness of the milk that makes these so good.  It gives both an extra richness and flavor.

Milk is available fresh year round, so one can try to get milk right from the dairy farm, raw, often that had been bottled just hours ago.

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Jersey cow personalities remind one of Golden Retriever personalities.   

 Sanitizing the Udder Before Hooking Up to the Milking Machine 

Throughout the entire process,  the milk is untouched by human hands.
Distributing some hay...

...and then applied an udder sanitizer/moisturizer after the cows had been milked.

There is always a lot of hand washing.


Ready for the Final Episode of Downton Abbey (on DVD)

36 comments:

HipWaldorf said...

I raised my teens on biodynamic raw milk, yogurt, cheese and produce. You are very lucky to have access so close to you! We are enjoying Downton Abbey as well. Enjoy the snow!

Anonymous said...

What a lovely post, with the contrast of the refined china and silver with the scenes of the dairy farm. I, too, enjoy using my family Wedgwood and silver, and a cup of hot chocolate sounds like just the thing!

Cheers,
Bitsy

Anonymous said...

A lovely post. We are enjoying the snow too. Wedgwood - I beleive it's the Williamsburg pattern. You are fortunate to have so many nice things passed down to you. The new season of Downton is good too. Cheers, JDS

Cranky Yankee said...

I caught a spot today on WGBH plugging 'The Music of Downton'. Some fun links:

http://www.wgbh.org/995/musicofdownton.cfm

Greenfield said...

Loved the pictures of that fabulous dairy barn; I also enjoy a raw-milk source, albeit a much smaller one, right on my way to the feed store where they also sell their own grass-fed beef. We too have eggs from our very own chickens, and I don't know what I'd do without them.
Once you've had The Real Thing, industrial food is completely tasteless (if you'll excuse the pun). Enjoy Downton!

Susan R said...

So many thoughts on this post. Something in me yearns for a farm life the minute I see cows and chickens running around. Maybe I just need one early morning with the cows to sway me either way.
Love the china. I wonder what your take is on having very nice china, but not a matching set. I love to collect different pieces.
Is that a Le Creuset pot for the chicken soup? Every time I pass a Williams Sonoma I want to buy one, but just can't seem to justify the cost. Maybe if you did one of your spotlight posts on the Le Creuset company I would consider it. Would that require a trip to France?

Susan R said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Marie said...

Le Creuset is a wonderful investment. I have three pieces and I use them often. How I would love to have a farm nearby to get fresh milk. Your visit to the farm reminds me of the wonderful time I had visiting Woodstock VT and the farm that belonged to Laurance Rockefeller's wifes family. Love the snow and hope for more, it makes you slow down.

Zenas313 said...

Susan R is quite right, so many thoughts on this post, but I could not agree more with your lead off - I would count on one hand (and have digits left over) the number of restaurants that are really worth the time and expense (Cafe Pasquale, Santa Fe, in fact, is the only one that comes to mind). Most times the food is no better than you could make at home and the "service"?

Homemade blueberry pancakes, real maple syrup and bacon this morning with the children - beats anything you could get by going out!

Jacob Phelps said...

I love the mismatched cups.

There is nothing quite as good as fresh food, that is for sure!

Thanks for sharing this post, Muffy!

Rose said...

I think the Jersey calves are the most adorable of all!

Anonymous said...

Muffy, did you have a friend pick-up the season 2 DVD setof Downton Abbey in the UK?

Rachel said...

I noticed the Le Creuset too. I found mine at Goodwill in perfect condition. Some people simply do not know what they have, perhaps their grandmothers had left them and they were cleaning out her house. I've found sterling flatware and wedgwood china at Goodwill too.

Knot just Nautical said...

Mmmmhmmm! Rice pudding and hot chocolate has been a favorite late night indulgence at our house as well. I prefer to stay away from Hershey's anything as it tastes nothing like chocolate imho. I either melt Cote d'Or chocolate or use a mixture of Ovaltine (malt) and Nesquick, heavy on the Ovaltine. Deeelish!

binker23 said...

@Rachael - I want to go Goodwill shopping with YOU!!

@Muffy - speaking of watching the final episode of Downton Abbey 2.....where do I find a reliable region free DVR? I would love to get all of those DVD's....like Foyle's War and the new Sherlock. Also, do you worry about e coli with the raw milk? I guess if you find a good source (and that source looks very sterile) ...then it is safer than store-bought milk.

Go Patriots!! Go Giants!!

tammy j said...

another delicious post!
i have coin silver spoons from my grandmother that look like yours, only with her own initials on them, of course. i keep them in a pewter and stone jug on a table in my library... and enjoy looking at them throughout the day... it's like she's here with me!
there is nothing like the sweet face of a jersey. i could almost smell the wonderful dairy farm scents as i scrolled through your post.
thank you as always, dear heart!
i know keeping a blog is work and just want you to know how much yours is appreciated!
tammy j

Suburban Princess said...

I have seen S2 as well and I cant wait for S3! I read there might be a movie as well!

You are fortunate the laws are on the side of consumers and farmers. Here we have a farmer on a hunger strike because it is against the law to sell milk straight from the cow. Having had butter made from a cow milked that morning I can attest to how delicious it is!

Anonymous said...

Yum! (I have to say that I agree with your comment about fresh food compared to restaurant food, but I also think I've had more than two truly exceptional restaurant meals. But, I travel extensively and eat out a lot, and those exceptional meals usually use the freshest local ingredients.)

Muffy, your comment about a meal in Tokyo is a good opening for a question I've long had for you (although the question does not really relate to this post, so perhaps you might want to respond in a new post, if not here.)

I have wondered... it seems that given your background and current socioeconomic level, you must travel internationally, at least on occasion. Do you do so very often? You've never had a post devoted to it. I am curious about your take on fashion and travel. My husband and I travel abroad quite a bit - usually a big trip to Europe or another international destination like Australia at least once a year, and usually twice. (We're fortunate, and since we don't have kids and live on the east coast, travel to Europe does not break the budget.) In addition although we currently live in rural New Hampshire, we spend a lot of time in big US cities like NYC, Chicago, and San Francisco (and Boston, of course.) I also lived abroad in a very diverse and "fashionable" city for a few years.

I find that I have sort of two wardrobes... my "preppy/country" wardrobe for home (and this is what I grew up with), and an edgier more urban wardrobe for cities. Travel abroad (particularly to places like Amsterdam, which is our next trip this spring) demands the edgier and more urban clothes in my already "edgier more urban" city wardrobe. It's not about not knowing myself, but rather feeling there are two sides to me. One is more appropriate to New England, and one side comes out in more "free" and artsy locations. I also enjoy dressing more like locals when I am in a new culture. If I wore my L.L. Bean clothes in certain European areas, I would stick out like a sore thumb. Plus, of course, travel broadens one's view of the world (including one's view of "acceptable" dress.)

So... how (if at all) does your wardrobe change when you travel internationally, particularly to urban areas? I've seen how your wardrobe changes when you travel to NYC, and I would say that those clothes would also fit into, say, London. But what about "funkier" destinations, or very non-American non-British destinations?

Anonymous said...

Muffy, thanks so much for the tips on region-free DVD players... we have a blu-ray player and I did not realize that blu-ray was region-free. I've wanted to get Doc Martin series 5 from amazon.co.uk... it comes out March 5. Alas it does not seem to be available in blu-ray, but I may just finally go for it and look for a region-free player.

Kionon said...

Can I saw how much it warms my heart to hear you say one of the two meals you deem exceptional was in my adopted country, Muffy?

I want to hear more about this trip to Tokyo, onegaishimasu.

Casey said...

I am curious about raw milk, and have been for many years. My only hold back has been one of safety. You mention your dairy is state tested. I can't recall if you are in Rhode Island or Connecticut. Are all dairies required to test? We live near New Haven and I also wondered if you could recommend dairies in that vicinity? I haven't lived here long enough to investigate the area as much as I would like.

Grace said...

The meal sounds fantastic! And your Wedgewood and silver look spectacular, Muffy.

Yankee-Whisky-Papa said...

Our governments have such a dysfunction about raw milk. Thankfully the tide seems to be turning...slowly. Truly great cheese is impossible without raw milk.

THE TRAVEL BUG: A Journal in Pictures said...

Inakaya is about a 10 minute walk from us and highly recommended among our expat friends! I love your blog and look forward to your posts! -Stephanie (Tokyo)

Parnassus said...

For a change, you should try the tapioca made Asian style, which is much lighter, more of a soup than a pudding. It is especially good with sliced bananas in it, and for those who crave extra richness, you can add coconut cream, or even dairy cream.
--Road to Parnassus

Billsburg said...

We have the oddest rules concerning raw milk here in Virginia. Farmers can't sell the milk, but they can sell shares of a cow. Since I'm 1/50th owner of a Jersey cow, I can get raw milk from our farmer's market but the jar has to be carried in a bag; other shoppers can't see the milk.

In order to buy the cow share, we had to sign more legal documents than we did than when we bought a house but it was well worth it.

The milk is delicious & rich & interestingly enough, my acid reflux problem has disappeared since I started drinking it.

It probably isn't a good idea to buy raw milk from an unknown source but having it and fresh eggs in the morning is a wonderful way to start the day.

Brian said...

Loved this post, Muffy. Alas, raw milk is illegal in NJ, but then again, so were runny eggs for a little while back in the early '90s. I would love to have access to raw milk for my family. For a while, we had fresh eggs from a family friend, but the local coyote population killed off all of their chickens! There really is no substitute for fresh food, though.

Vintage Wasp said...

Gorgeous dishes Muffy! Ah!

My husband is a ND and we use raw milk (except for my lactose intolerant daughter whom drinks rice or soy) and love it! It is not easy to find in my state.

I hope you enjoyed the snow!

We have been thoroughly enjoying Downton. I will look for Gosford at our library as I have not seen it yet and if it is like Downton I should and quickly.

mary anne said...

Love this post! I agree with you about homey, fresh, vs. restaurants.

Anonymous said...

Somehow I missed out on the first series of Downton Abbey... I thoroughly enjoy "modern" British dramas and mysteries, but have stayed away from the period dramas. I decided to catch up so that I could watch series two, and what a wonderful surprise! Partway through the first episode, my husband and I were hooked. If we had had more time, we would have watched more than just the first three in one sitting. I can't wait to go back for more!

PBS was supposed to premiere a documentary last night called "Secrets of the Manor House," but I couldn't find it on any local PBS station, and we get three, including WGBH. The entire episode is available now at pbs.org.

binker23 said...

I love coming to this blog. It brightens up my day.

@Muffy thanks for the answers to raw milk and to region free DVD players.

I do agree that homemade food, made with quality ingredients is better than 99% of restaurants any day. Having said that, I have been in a number of restaurants that use fresh, local ingredients and have always enjoyed their meals (especially, as I don't have to do the cooking). Al Forno in Providence, RI; Al Covo in Venice, Italy and Wildwood in Portland, Oregon...to name a few.

It has been a long time, but, if my memory serves me correctly, I don't believe I enjoyed Gosford Park nearly as much as I love, love, love Downton Abbey. Last night was wonderful!! I loved the singing/soldiers/surprise at the end of episode 3. I can't wait for next week!!!

@Anonymous 4:25 and @Muffy ...I shall look forward to hearing more about "preppy" and European travel. I have traveled abroad fairly extensively and generally go with black (especially in major cities and most definitely in Italy) ...adding color in accessories such as scarves. I rarely travel in the summer months, so, I seldom wear khaki. I did spend several summers in Great Britain (England..June/July) and (primarily Scotland ..August..different year) and wore khaki's a lot.

Lottie_v said...

Hello!
I was wondering what your soup recipe was? It looks very nutritious.

Anonymous said...

This post inspired me to make chicken soup today. It snowed all day, and soup sounded better and better. Since I live in the Southwest, I made tortilla soup.

Seraph Cynosure said...

I'm making my own little cookbook based on recipes that I find appealing, and I was wondering if you would share your recipes for the Chicken Soup, Fish Eye Pudding, and Hot Chocolate. The latter is self explanatory, however, ratios matter

C said...

Mrs. A, your blue Dutch oven! I believe I have the same one, and I'm always impressed by its ability to turn a meh-looking soup/stew into "food porn". It's a very photogenic pot.

ANH Style said...

I adore your silver with the A's on it! Hot chocolate at your house sounds like quite a treat.