Friday, March 9, 2012

Yankee Magazine and Dublin, New Hampshire


Long timeYankee Magazine Editor-in-Chief, Judson Hale, has written the definitive book on the soul of New England, the delightful Inside New England.

And the magazine is now in good hands with the new editor, Yankee Magazine veteran,  Mel Allen.  In an era of declining standards on many fronts, Yankee Magazine is still in top form. (Although it did take many a while to get used to the larger format.)

One has to be charmed at an office that uses rocking chairs as guest seating. 
The founders of The Old Farmer's Almanac remain present.
Paying homage to the great Judson Hale. 
And part of how Yankee Magazine maintains its character, no doubt, is being an integral part of the lovely New Hampshire town of Dublin, just down the street from Peterborough.



Here is a link to one of Jud Hale's monthly columns:
The index to all of his columns is here.

26 comments:

LoneStarPrep said...

I love reading Yankee Magazine. My parents used to purchase it all the time when I was young... probably helped spark my obession with New England : ) The town looks picturesque, too... I hope to make it up north sometime in life!

Anonymous said...

For as long as I can remember, my parents (in Maine) have had a subscription to Yankee. I have to admit that I am not thrilled with the new format and I feel that the character has changed a bit - it feels more like a mainstream magazine, which is not a good thing.

Grace said...

Looks great there! I'll have to read Yankee Magazine sometime.

Anonymous said...

Best.Line.Ever!

"And although our speaker claims no Mayflower descendance, he does have a relative who ran for the boat and missed it."

-Flo

The Ancient said...

Years ago, the wife and I were dragooned into attending great-niece's "Diversity Day" at her uber-liberal private school.

As Diversity Day required "ethnic food", we had the housekeeper prepare innumerable sandwiches on Pepperidge Farm Bread, sans crust, with lots of butter, and either watercress or sliced cucumber. It was a huge hit, all around.

The wife and I sat on little chairs in the front of the room and she patiently explained what it was like to have had six ancestors on The Mayflower. (Short version: She could not have cared less.) When she was finished, some wiseacre asked if I felt somehow inferior. Not at all, I said, as I had eight. All different.

BUT REALLY, the old joke has always been -- as you surely know -- that the servant class was sent ahead.

Main Line Sportsman said...

Always loved Yankee....read it at my parents house. particularly fond of Earl Proloiux(SP?)the guy who knew all the weird tools and devices and could tell you how to fix anything with boiled linseed oil or neutral spirits or baking soda.....I was really sad when the announced his passing.

Pink Julep Abroad said...

Have never heard of Yankee Magazine... Will have to check it out!

christine said...

Hello ! Thanks for the reference about the book on New England. I'm French but it is THE dream place for me. I only know New-York, but in my next life, I want to live in Maine !

Cranky Yankee said...

Thanks for the link to 'The Man Who Stepped on Plymouth Rock FIRST'. Did you know that if John Howland had not been rescued, there would have been no F.D.R., no Bush 41 or 43? Also no Humphrey Bogart, Dr. Spock or Sarah Palin.

Anonymous said...

A comment, which may or may not be appropriate here. First, I am all for true "diversity." I think everyone should know about and experience other cultures, and value them, and I "walk the talk" with extensive travel, and close friends from around the world. That said, as someone who has spent most of my life in higher education, as a student and an educator, I've become very opposed to things like "diversity day," for numerous reasons. This sort of thing was probably a worthy effort initially, but is now very forced. One of the things which bothers me the most, though, is that "diversity" means "non-white" or probably more accurately, "non-WASP." I understand that the intent is to celebrate ethnicities which lie outside the dominant one in the US. That said, a rather unfair and regretable thing seems to have happened - it's as if caucasians with northern/western European roots are without ethnicity.

One can argue that for years and years those with (say) British ancestry were able to celebrate this ancestry, and now it is the turn of others, but I disagree. Understanding facts of European history, or the story of the pilgrims and the Mayflower is not the same as understanding and celebrating daily life and customs of our ancestors. And I think now it's as if we are to be ashamed of our own ancestry... there can be nothing interesting about white people from Europe. This background is almost without exception ignored in "diversity" celebrations.

WRJ said...

The column you linked to contains just the right amount of irreverence that is necessary when discussing ancestry. Not to avoid offense, mind you, but to make the topic even slightly interesting. Hale's wry New England humor is much appreciated.

I really enjoy Yankee magazine, even though, as a lifelong Nutmegger, it makes me question whether Connecticut belongs in New England at all. It's particularly nice to see a regional magazine publishing about topics beyond the decorative arts, humongous mansions for sale, "charity" "events," etc. (Is it obvious that I recently leafed through Westport Magazine?)

Muffy Aldrich said...

@WRJ - Fair warning - I am less than 24 hours away from blathering on about some more "not even slightly interesting" genealogy. Fairfield County should simply be gifted to New York.

Cranky Yankee said...

To WRJ's point, I remember reading a piece in 'Yankee' probably 30+ years ago which tried to track Connecticut fans through the seasons and different pro sports. It was interesting to see how loyalties shifted between New York and Boston.

Anonymous said...

:) I knew somewhere else Muffy had commented about that. I finally found it in the Thimble Island post (http://www.muffyaldrich.com/2011/06/connecticuts-thimble-islands.html) where she wrote "From my perspective, however, the southernmost part of New England in Connecticut is the Thimble Islands" in Branford, CT.

Marie said...

Yankee Magazine has always been a family favorite-and the link was hilarious. I think genealogy is fascinating. I love to think of why my ancestors came in the 1630s and how it is possible that not one of them made any significant contributions that would be noteworthy today. They were just living the life! Of course some of the Puritan ones are probably rolling over knowing that their descendants not only married Irish but RC members to boot!

Yankee-Whisky-Papa said...

My Nanna is still alive, and would fume at the suggestion of Fairfield being New York's.

As for Yankee Magazine, remember that the Town of Dublin has many other lesser known but still great businesses. Famous Persian rug sellers, vintage automobile restoration and repairing just to name a few.

Anonymous said...

Well you know, for many years, New England Toyota Dealers Association has left Connecticut off the map of New England they use in their TV ads!

My attempt to find new proof of this just now led to this amusing site:

http://noagenda.wordpress.com/2010/10/

Greenfield said...

If Fairfield County seceded to become part of New York, (which has been discussed), two things would happen immediately: We'd have much better trains, and the State of Connecticut would promptly go broke. ;)

As one whose antecedents have held the fort here since 1657, I have to admit that looking for New England in Fairfield County is nowadays like looking for traces of feudal Japan in downtown Tokyo. You do have to work at it, but the winds of the old days still touch the misty gravestones of Fairfield's Old Burying Ground, the craggy timbered ridgelines of Redding, and the hidden falls of Devil's Den. The ghosts may visit you, on a boat in Southport Harbor an hour before dawn . . .

CashmereLibrarian said...

Although I did not grow up in New England, my mother subscribed to Yankee Magazine for many years. My favorite section to read was "Houses for Trade."
So happy to know its still in publication!

Margie said...

Mary's Farm by Edie Clark is my favorite part of Yankee.
Have never been in New England, but I plan to make it in the next year or two.

Yankee Magazine said...

Muffy,
Thanks for visiting Yankee Magazine's office. The next time you are here, you should get a tour of Jud's Museum: http://new.yankeemagazine.com/video/einsteins-brain.

Heather Atwell
Communications Manager
Yankee Magazine

Muffy Aldrich said...

@Yankee Magazine - "THE" Jud's Museum? Absolutely!

Patsy said...

Connecticut = Newyorkachusetts

Completely stolen from a Dunkin Donuts commercial.

Dawn said...

A belated thank you for posting this, Muffy. I love listening to Jud's New England Journal and can't wait to catch up on all of them. I drove past the Yankee building in Dublin many times going back and forth between Keene and Peterborough, NH and hearing Mr. Hale's voice and Yankee humor is reminding me of happy days.

This is the second reference to Yankee Magazine I've read in a week and surely a sign I need to subscribe!

Katahdin said...

I prefer "Down East"

Anonymous said...

I have been reading the "Yankee" for many, many years now. I have kept every copy. Many with dog-eared pages of my favorite recipes and articles. Reading it always takes me to another place. I don't much care for articles or advertisements of things non-New England, though. The larger format didn't bother me, although the uniqueness of the small format was quite nice, it was easy to stuff in a tote and took up far less space on our bookshelves. --Holly in PA