Saturday, April 14, 2012

Spring Dishes







13 comments:

Mags said...

Lovely!

Worthington said...

Do I see some Botanic Garden from PM? I hope to inherit my parents Botanic Garden set, as it is just so beautiful and cheery. They were married in 1978, so I guess it was still new then. My favorite dish in the collection is what we have always used as a lasagne dish but looks nothing like what is available today.

Tammy B said...

How pretty and springy (if that is a word). No one knows who got my grandmother Limoges china. It sort of disappeared in the distribution of her things. Not worth making someone mad. I love all kind of dishes. My favorite is Johnson Brothers Willow Blue. I have a variety of different pieces, most from the Wedgewood/Waterford outlets. I have trouble adding unusual pieces since the WW outlets closed. Best friend's grandmother had Franciscan Ivy. She had everything: luncheon dishes and dinner dishes, plus all of the accessories. We call them Lucy dishes (were used on "I Love Lucy").

Anonymous said...

What a lovely ritual and beautiful cupboard!

Bitsy

Greenfield said...

This only makes me more depressed that another one of my dearly beloved Squadron A glasses broke last night. I think I'd better not dare use the rest of them any more. . . sigh.

Marie said...

There is such a sense of continuity in using inherited china-mother's, grandmother's and great grandmother's china all of pride of place.

Anonymous said...

Oh! I think I spy Wedgwood 'India' as well, yes? It's a lovely pattern. Perfect for spring.

Count me in as a fan of the classic Blue Willow/Willow Blue. A few years ago our chickens scratched up an antique fragment of Blue Willow in the back garden. I brought it into the house and placed it on one of my own pieces to see the pattern matched exactly. An exciting and satisfying reminder of history so close at hand.

~Eliza

Kionon said...

We have some Wedgewood, I think. I'd have to go digging through our cabinets. I know we have several items going back to the late 1800s/early 1900s.

My family's most beloved dishes are made out of what is called "depression glass." Wiki has a decent overview. Before the depression, the family was financially secure. After the depression, the family was financially secure. However, the depression years were truly times of want. My grandmother tells stories of cutting fronts off of shoes to make them last longer.

While very valuable monetarily (depression glass now is rare on the open market and goes for hundreds of dollars in some cases) to us the value has nothing to do with money, and everything to do with history. In its pastel greens and pinks, it is the perfect placement for spring!

Karen said...

A lovely corner cupboard. I was wondering if you have ever had breakage due to hanging your cups on teacup hooks. I would love to do this in my cupboard, but my mother-in-law convinced my husband that this is dangerous. Enjoy your spring dishes!

Anonymous said...

I laughed when I read this because after almost 30 years my partner and I can not agree on a pattern we both like. We have gotten by using an old aunt's Wedgewood and 4 sets of Depression Glass that we have rotated on a seasonal basis. Three years ago we did buy a service for 40 of a department store china for a dinner party; but that doesn't count.

Kevin

Joyce N said...

What is the white basketweave pattern on the top shelf? The serving bowl, platter, cups and saucers.
Thanks.

Joyce N said...

Forgot to mention what a lovely cupboard! A family piece?

shoe cupboard said...

What a lovely ritual and beautiful cupboard!!