Wednesday, November 7, 2012

New England Agricultural Fairs


It is no surprise that the big finale of E.B. White’s Charlotte’s Web took place at the local agricultural fair. This time of year, the local fairs, no doubt modeled after their U.K. counterparts, provide unique opportunities for all involved.

Some love the food, or the competition, or the fund-raising, or the festivities. They are a surprisingly integral part of New England life and serve as almost a melting pot for the region, connecting people who otherwise might not see each other any other time of the year.  Here are some photos from our archives.








 
 
 
 



 
 
 

 




23 comments:

Anonymous said...

Muffy,
Do you frequent any fairs and if so, which ones would you recommend?

-K

Parnassus said...

Every time I see your father's pictures, both the photographic quality and the way way he captured his subjects, I resolve to become a better photographer.
--Road to Parnassus

Juli said...

Muffy,

Is it just me, or does the girl in jodhpurs (wearing the striped shirt on the left in the tenth photograph) bear a striking resemblance to you? Beautiful photographs; no wonder your father enjoyed them most. Thank you for sharing.

Marie said...

As a child growing up in Westchester County I remember going to the Grange Fair in Yorktown each year. It was fun for a young child. Now I am amazed that these fairs continued to exist in what fast becoming suburbia.

Joyce N said...

So, Muffy, when is your book of your Father's photographs coming out?

Anonymous said...

I think you have inherited your father's wry sense of humor.

Joyce N said...

I am fortunate to have a friend - Stan Waterman from The Punch Bowl in Maine - who was fortunate to have E. B. White as a neighbor. I think of Stan every time I hear a mention of E. B. White. Both are treasures.

anglow said...

I am reminded of the words of Ogden Nash...

Sure, deck your limbs in pants;
Yours are the limbs, my sweeting.
You look divine as you advance --
Have you seen yourself retreating?

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the lovely photographs. I too am hoping for a collection of your father's work in book form.

James said...

Thank you Muffy, I enjoy your Father's work so much.

Joyce N said...

Loved the Ogden Nash quote!

Kathadin said...

Fond memories of the Blue Hill fair. I wonder if it still nice...

Katahdin said...

Not to lower the tone, but I must say a woman in breeches works for me...

chris said...

Fabulous - as always. Love these authentic views of time and place. You should put these photos together in a book...New England in the _____. I'm sure you could make several wonderful volumes.

Anonymous said...

Love the photos! Thanks for sharing!

Krystle

Woofboxer said...

Great pictures Muffy, you wear those jodphurs well. How did you get your name by the way?

BlueTrain said...

I am surprised to see oxen (in the first photo, no less). I've never seen working oxen. Yet my father claimed to have "broken" a yoke of oxen while working on a farm while a prisoner of war in Germany 1944/1945.

Lynn said...

You can go see ox-pulling in a couple weeks at the Fryeburg Fair: www.fryeburgfair.com/Oxen-and-Steers.html

Greenfield said...

So many wonderfully craggy old New England faces!

Anonymous said...

they are still like this in rural communities in Australia.

Anonymous said...

Good photos. I managed to get to the Illinois State Fair this year, and plan to enter some homemade cheese in the 2013 state fair.

Anonymous said...

Muffy, What gorgeous photos! Thank you for sharing them; they are so authentic and touching. Beth

Patsy said...

I love these Father's Photos Posts. They seem to be taken around the time when I was a little kid and bring back such nice memories.

We took my stepson & nephews to the Topsfield Fair for years when they were young. The Fair has a tent for breastfeeding Moms and every year we'd try to convince the kids that it was an exhibition tent.