Friday, March 21, 2014

First Day of Spring

The hens start laying again just as the plant catalogs arrive.
 Spring has arrived in New England, not only according to the calendar but in more evidentiary ways as well.

Combs and wattles reclaim their brightness and size.

The hum of work returns to boat yards as new docks are put in.

Some vessels are still ensconced.







Some vessels are ready for the water.




Some, such as this beautiful Apreamare, are already in.



And there are puppies.

32 comments:

Joyce North said...

I do love the puppies!

Mayes Hall said...

My father always wanted the boat in the water by May 1.

darkirishtweedboy said...

What a gorgeous puppy! The Volvo V70 featured in a particular picture is the same colour as the one my Dad had for work. You've reminded me of some great journeys in that car! Here's to warmer days and the return to favourite outdoor pastimes.

Michael Rowe said...

TDP is standing in for crocuses this year. As C.S. Lewis called this time of year, we are still in "the waiting room of the world," and spring is taking her sweet green time to put in an appearance.

mary anne said...

Perfect post for today. Sunny, but still quite cold in my neck of the woods.

Patsy said...

"The boatyard guys are starting to work off the winter layer."

Brewer's?

Scotmiss said...

Anytime there are golden puppies around it is that perfect first day of spring . . .

Craig Soars said...

After a promising week of warmth, we were greeted by heavy snowfall and a sharp drop to sub-zero temperatures on the first day of spring. Such is life in Western Canada. Still, I look forward to the long days and time spent tending the garden.

I also notice the shedding of dog fur has been omitted from your list of spring happenings...

WRJ said...

What a pretty chicken! And that adorable puppy looks like trouble.

WendyBee said...

Yeah, the puppy got to me, and made me forget any other comment I had been thinking about the boats. Yes, we are finally seeing a little hint of what we euphemistically call Spring, here in Maine. Meaning that a large part of the snow cover has sublimed, evaporated and melted. The rhododendron leaves are uncurled in the sunshine today. The wind is quite blustery and the clouds are "scudding" (whatever that really means) along in the blue sky. It is still light out when we eat dinner, and our skin has some hope of converting a little vitamin D when we go outside. I wish I were putting a yacht into the water for the season, but alas, I don't have one. I shall settle for doing a little kayaking when the water gets warm in July and August.
Thanks for the interesting pictures, hope you're enjoying our pretty Spring days. For myself, I'm not truly assured of Spring's arrival until I see forsythia and pussy willows, and hear the peepers in the evening.

jo baldwin said...

My Labs don't wait for spring.

F. Hastings said...

Well ,Here in Woodstock , Vt we are still looking at 2 feet of snow on the ground with more to come .

We are envious of you coastal folks .

Anonymous said...

Still have snow on the ground in north central Connecticut in our town near Hartford. But it is melting quickly. I am hoping Spring shows up next week.

Cheers,
Gary

Heather said...

Please make kids preppy essentials

Alexandra said...

Love the puppy! Slightly warmer temps here in coastal South Shore Mass. and more daylight are helping us to "think spring", but the boat won't be in the water for at least another month. Sigh.

Sunfish60669 said...

You know summertime is around the corner when customers start picking up their boats from winter storage. That shot of the boatyard reminds me of my grandfather's shop when we opened for the season! :)

- JNL

Anonymous said...

The advent of spring always meant a weekend visit from my Vermont grandparents. Saturday morning, my father would drive my grandfather up to the old HP Hood farm, as Vermont men can’t bear to be away from cows for too long.

My mother, grandmother, Aunt Twiddy and I would take the train into Boston for the New England Flower Show, a dazzling display of horticultural beauty. I remember the heat and humidity inside the show, in stark contrast to the chill outside, but a reminder that spring weather was just around the corner.

We always had lunch at Schrafft’s, the immense interior of which was much like that of Selfridge & Co in London, with its army of black uniformed waitresses circling the tables like honey bees.

For me, as an adult, spring always began with The Masters, even before I gave up tennis for golf. Augusta National’s rhododendrons, however, were no match for my grandmother’s magnificent gardens, which annually inspired her neighbors to imitation. My grandmother’s secret ingredient, sheep manure.

Wonderful post, Muffy!

MGC

Flo said...

The picture of the puppy--awww!! Reminds me of our golden when he was a puppy, he used to love to chew on my hands, not hard, just kind of nibbled. The photos of the boats are gorgeous, I sure hope spring is here to stay.

Joyce North said...

MGC, it is such a pleasure to read your comments. Perhaps you might consider writing a book of memoirs.

I can't wait to read Muffy's book, and I look forward to yours.

Anonymous said...

@Joyce North, thank you, but I’m only good for short bursts, always dodging the minefield of potential grammatical and spelling errors that dyslexia lays before me. Writing a simple sentence is a challenge. Oddly enough, the Landmark School for dyslexics was founded down the road from where I grew up, alas too late for me to attend.

I will say this blog triggers New England memories, both coastal and country, that no amount of hypnotics would uncover. Reading The Daily Prep is part of my daily routine, and there are few subjects with which I fail to identify. It’s equally interesting that the New England ethos herein touches people from all over, which is to say it holds many universal qualities worthy of discussion.

When I first saw the photo of eggs resting on a flower catalog, I immediately thought of my grandfather’s hen house, the individual posts and beams inside his barn, sunlight coming through cobwebbed windows, my grandmother’s love of gardening and her enthusiasm for springtime planting. One simple photo opened the floodgates.

MGC

Anonymous said...

Hello, all.

To add to this post and tie in to a recent posting of Muffy's, tomorrow is Maine Maple Sunday. The sap is running slowly due to the stubborn cold days, but still a great time. Worth a day trip to support Maine businesses still producing things the old-fashioned way.

Mainemapleproducers.com

Wendy Bee, where in Maine are you? In the shadow of Portland Head light here.

Anonymous said...

MGC, perhaps dictating a memoir ... with a friend's assistance or if you live near a university, students are a handy way to go for a reasonable fee or internship. No pressure.;)

Bitsy said...

Though few in words, this post says so much about the beginning of spring, with the photos of the beautiful bowl of fresh eggs, the boats coming out of winter storage, and ending with that heart-tugging puppy. I miss having chickens, although I enjoy listening to those of my neighbor and enjoying their occasional gift of bountiful overflow. We look forward to the first day out on our boat. But for now, I think I have puppy fever!

Katahdin said...

I have car topped my wooden 18' sea kayak on our silver V70 but never a Cape Dory (sic) sloop...

Max said...


MGC,

your comment earlier reminded me of a quote I came across recently: '' Ironically, those of us with the highest vision and the highest standards sometimes hold back because we're always measuring ourselves against our ideals. People with low standards often feel that they measure up just fine.'' :-)

In my fantasies I wish I had your skill and level of expression, grammar and spelling! hahaha You are one of the most eloquent and sophisticated writers I have come across. You make it feel effortless, and reading pleasurable. Knowing about your challenges makes me admire you and your skill even more.

Wonderful post. Beauty all around!

Happy Spring Equinox Everybody :-)

Scotmiss said...

Max, I agree with your thoughts about MGC - a very talented and interesting member of our TDP community. Cheers!

Joyce North said...

MGC, I couldn't agree more that this blog triggers memories and thoughts that enrich us readers. I am so grateful for it!

Your writing is wonderful! As a student teacher, I was fortunately allowed to teach Creative Writing to two very different groups of children - one 7th grade of remedial students and an 8th grade of A students. At first they were asked to write thoughts with no consideration of rules of grammar, spelling, or punctuation. I was thrilled to find that both groups produced flows of thought equally interesting.

You write - let us enjoy!

Anonymous said...

Still cold and grey here, but those precious puppy eyes just melt my heart!

Anonymous said...

That puppy is beyond adorable!!!! Love seeing the buzz of activity emerge from the dusky, cold "look" of winter. Our bulb flowers have been peeking up from the mulch since early March. The last week of April is about when we start our "un-wintering" and get out our patio furniture, scrub the house, spring cleaning, etc. --Holly in PA

Patsy said...

MGC, my stepson went to Landmark. They taught him how to learn and we are forever grateful.

Put me on the "I love your comments" list!

Meg said...

That puppy!

Maggie Lodge said...

And then there are puppies with muddy paws!